The 3 Versions of Oakley Radar

Oakley Radar sunglasses have been knocking around the sports world for a decade now, and their popularity shows no signs of diminishing. Unlike other generational products that get phased out once a new version comes along, you can still purchase all three versions of the Radars on our site or Oakley’s site (as of the date of this publication) and on marketplaces such as Amazon ,Ebay, ioffer.

If you’re trying to decide which frame is best for you, this comparison will hopefully guide you in the right direction.

Just so we’re all clear right from the start, “Radar” (or Radarlock or Radar EV) is the name of the frame. Path, Pitch, Range, etc. are the names of the lens styles. These lenses are all interchangeable within their respective frame (e.g., Radarlock Pitch lenses and Radarlock Path lenses both fit the Radarlock frames).

Oakley Radar ( 2006 )

Oakley first introduced the Radars in 2006. In keeping with heritage style characteristics of the M Frames, the Radars feature hammer stem profiles, a brow that dips slightly in the center, and a single shield lens.

The stems feature round holes, which Oakley calls “surge ports,” designed to help improve airflow. The earsocks run almost to the end of the stems, and the tips of the stems flare slightly (almost imperceptibly) outward. If you run your fingers along the ends, you’ll notice the shift. In theory, these flared tips should assist with putting the sunglasses on — especially one-handed while riding a bicycle.

There are 4 Oakley lens shapes available for the Radars (8 if you count the vented versions of each). In order of smallest to largest they are:

  • Edge
  • Path
  • Pitch
  • Range

Oakley marketed the Edge within the women’s line, but there’s nothing markedly feminine about the shape. I’m not going to pitch any “Pink it and Shrink it” theories here, but needless to say, the Edge is just as unisex as the other options.

Ultimately, it comes down to which shape you like best.

Oakley Radar Xl (2006)

More or less the exact same frame as the Radar, the Radar XL features added length between the nose bridge and brow. This extra 7 mm provides more vertical coverage, which is especially helpful for cyclists riding in the attack position.

Unlike the standard Radar however, the XL version only has one lens — the Blade.

Although that was the name when first released, the lens is often marketed simply as “Radar XL.”

Oakley Radarlock (2012)

In 2012, Oakley released the Radarlock. This generation has the same look and feel as the first — similar size and the same lens shapes, but there are enough distinct differences to set it apart.

The main difference being Oakley’s patented “Switchlock” technology. Instead of a press and pop method, the left temple features a locking mechanism. When unlatched, the temple swings open, allowing for an easier lens removal/installation process.

The Radarlock XLs are the exact same frame as the Radarlocks, but with an added 7 mm between the nose bridge and top of the frame (same concept as the Radars vs the Radar XL frames).

Oakley Radar EV (2015)

A modern twist on the previous generations, the Radar EV is still easily identifiable as part of the Radar family but departs from the curving sweep of the brow to a more angular look. Instead of dipping above the nose bridge, the brow of the Radar EV is straight across the middle before angling downward into 2 sloping steps about two-thirds of the way to the temples.

Returning to what worked in the original Radar frame, Oakley ditched its Switchlock technology for the 3rd generation of the Radars, favoring instead the pressure click-in system. The hinges are pulled closer in so that the tips don’t hit the lens when folded. And the surge ports are much smaller — more rectangular and positioned closer to the hinge.

The Unobtanium earsocks cover almost the entire length of the stems, with only the flared ends and the areas around the surge ports left untouched.

But what most sets the Radar EV apart from its predecessors in terms of function has to be its lens design.

The “EV” stands for “extended vision” and for obvious reasons. The lenses feature an added 5 mm above the nose bridge, extending the upper field of view. As with the XL versions of previous generations, this taller lens keeps the brow out of sight (or nearly so) when in a head down, eyes up position (such as the aero position while cycling).

Although still available in the Path and Pitch styles, the Radar EV only comes with vented versions of these lenses.

NOTE:  There are XL subsets and straight stem versions for the Radar and Radarlock, and Asian Fit frames available in all 3 generations so there’s technically ten frames within the Radar family.

The XL frames are no longer sold by Oakley, but you can still find replacement lenses and parts on our Replica Oakley Sunglasses Site or their site and floating around the internet.

What is special for Fake Oakley sunglasses Free Shipping?

What do you look out for while selecting your sunglasses? If you were to make a list, it might not end. From style, shape and color right down to its prime utility, there are an infinite number of things you need to take into consideration. This has given rise to a number of debates evaluating alternatives – which one works better? A similar debate is the topic of discussion here. It is the debate between two types of cheap Oakley sunglasses free shipping lenses – Iridium lenses versus polarized ones.

Unless you are living on extreme ends at either side of the equator, you would realize the day-to-day weather is quite unpredictable. It may be extremely sunny one day followed by an extremely foggy one. Most sunglass lenses are built for specific environmental conditions – a lens that works well in absolutely bright days may not work as well when it gets a little shady. This is one reason why there is no one-for-all solution when it comes to sunglasses.

This is also the basic reason why Oakley iridium lenses are contrasted with polarized lenses in terms of their utility in clearing vision and blocking sunlight and harmful UV rays. Here is everything you need to know about the two lenses to help you decide.

Oakley Iridium Lenses

Contrary to popular belief, Oakley iridium lenses do not refer to a special composition of the lens itself. Rather, it consists of a special metal oxide coating on the lens that exhibits specific properties. This coating allows you to tailor the lens according to specific environmental conditions.

The saturation and composition of this coating helps you to regulate the glare, reflection, light transmission and light absorption. In short, you can vary the amount of light that is reflected off the lens, is absorbed by the lens and the amount which reaches your eye. You can fine-tune these figures within a range of 9% and 92% oakley knockoffs sale.

This screening method has a lot to do with the wavelengths of light rays. Nevertheless, you might need to buy a large variety of iridium lenses for different environmental conditions

Oakley Polarized Lenses

Polarized lenses work as shields against discomforting glares. Oakley polarized lenses permeate Plutonite – replica Oakleys free shippping signature lens material – around an integrated polarizer. This helps in clearing vision, minimizing deformation, and protecting the filter against damages by wear and tear. Moreover, Plutonite is capable of blocking out all harmful UV radiations and other light rays. This is one reason why polarized lenses are preferred for sunglasses by most people